Home arrow Community arrow FORUM arrow For learners and educators arrow Teaching for mobile learners arrow Attainment Impact of PDAs or Hybrid Mobile Learning Devices
Attainment Impact of PDAs or Hybrid Mobile Learning Devices

Forum Menu

Home  Help  Search  Login  Register 


Pages: [1] Go Down  
Send this topic Print
Author Topic: Attainment Impact of PDAs or Hybrid Mobile Learning Devices  (Read 4226 times)
jonnydavey
New Member
*


Jonny Davey

Posts: 7
Karma: 0
Offline Offline


View Profile WWW
« on: March 20, 2006, 02:56:21 PM »

I have been asked by the LEA to find concrete evidence of handheld devices having a direct impact on attainment.  The evidence can come from any subject or key stage.  Do you know of a study I could use?  The evidence will be used in a roadshow to take around the borough to present to Building Schools of the Future (BSF) teacher focus groups.
Logged
DaleE
New Member
*
Posts: 6
Karma: 2
Offline Offline


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2006, 04:03:55 PM »

Tony Vincent's Soft reset podcast #10 dealt with Research and Handhelds.  It had some information (as does Tony's site)about finding research, and where the research is in general.  Handhelds are fairly new and the initial first few years of research needs to be followed up.

http://learninginhand.com/softreset/index.html

Logged
DaleE
New Member
*
Posts: 6
Karma: 2
Offline Offline


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2006, 04:52:15 PM »

Quick little thought on my part (I could be completely wrong).....

The functional abilities of handhelds have increased tremendously over the last few years, and can perform the same operations as their larger (but necessarily more powerful) cousins.

If you're asking a handheld to do the same type of operations (skill and drill, data bases, spreadsheets, word processors, etc.) as a laptop or PC, then it seems to me that research on the impact of these individual functions in an educational setting would apply to a handheld.

perhaps from a reseach perspective, that may be sloppy and unsatisfying.
Logged
Jocelyn
Moderator
Active Member
*****


Posts: 49
Karma: 5
Offline Offline


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2006, 12:41:05 PM »

David Perry's report on the first year of the Learning to Go initiative available from http://wgfl.wolverhampton.gov.uk/PDASite/index.html indicates clear increases in ICT capability however I am concerned about demands for evidence of increases in attainment. There is no clear evidence that ICT whether handheld or not raises attainment across the board for all pupils.Like any other educational tool, it works for some people all the time and for all people some of the time.  Also as with any educational intervention it is impossible to entirely control for outside variables.

There may be some info available from Chafford Hundred CAmpus school in Thurrock, they are now using PDAs and their last Ofsted indicates above average results.

Indications from a project I am running with teachers using handhelds are that PDAs are just one part of an ICT enabled environment with particular affordances for instant access to information, learning resources and multimodal means of recording. However they would not be first choice if dedicated hardware was available and it is having the flexibility of choice of tool and always having one to hand which is so enabling/supportive of achievement.
Logged
Mark van 't Hooft
Full Member
***


Posts: 166
Karma: 6
Offline Offline


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2006, 08:15:53 PM »

There will be a good book chapter on this coming out in August in an edited book I've been working on. The citation is:

van 't Hooft, M., & Swan, K. (2006). Ubiquitous computing in education: Invisible technology, visible impact. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum Associates.

Information about it can be found here: https://www.erlbaum.com/shop/tek9.asp?pg=products&specific=0-8058-5736-2

The chapter in question is one by Shin, Norris, & Soloway, and is entitled "Findings from Early Research on One-to-One Handheld Use in K-12 Education". This chapter echoes some of what you have posted here. Here is the chapter abstract:

Quote
"What is the evidence that handheld computing devices are having a positive impact on teaching and learning in K-12 education? To address that question, this chapter reviews the empirical research that has been conducted to date. Studies find that handheld use by students can lead to increases in motivation and achievement. That said, given the exceedingly early stage of handheld use in K-12 education and given the types of research methods that have been employed in the empirical work (e.g., interviews with students and teachers, surveys), the research findings, while suggestive, are not yet compelling.  In summarizing upwards of 35 studies, our intent is to help the educational community better understand the conditions that must be in place in order for handhelds to support positive learning outcomes."

Mark

BTW, I was the guest on Soft Reset #10  Grin
Logged

Mark van 't Hooft
Researcher/Tech Specialist
Kent State University
Research Center for Educational Technology
Kent, OH
USA
Pages: [1] Go Up  
Send this topic Print
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP

Powered by SMF 1.1.5 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC

© 2008 handheld Handheld Learning

Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Login

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
November 22, 2008, 04:47:44 PM
Username:

Password:


Login with username, password and session length
Forgot your password?

Polls

What did you enjoy most at HHL 08 this year?
  



RSS RSS