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Di Dawson
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« Reply #15 on: January 29, 2007, 04:47:48 PM »

Hi there

As an old lady and one who used her PSP regularly I have to say that itís great!

I donít play games Ė never have Ė but I have bought a Talkman for it. Itís software including a microphone which has 3000 phrases in 6 languages. Some of the games can be shared using the WLAN. Really useful revision for any age.
 
I use mine to demonstrate the use of video for 16+ learners. I have various versions including ones Iíve taken using my mobile, some taken off DVDs and others Iíve converted from *.avi or *.mpeg4 vid files from dv cameras.  I use the Xilisoft software (DVD to PSP) but since discovered ConvertMovie which also converts to mp4 for the Ipod as well!

I also use  it to web browse  especially in the evening when I canít be bothered to turn my pc on again so I can check emails etc.

But text entry is a painÖ Can anyone recommend a keyboard which will work with a PSP?  I do find the text entry frustrating, as itís not quite logical like any of my mobiles. Iím forever deleting what Iíve just spent ages typing in!

I'm also happy to evaluate any software created for PSPs
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mr_mahoney
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« Reply #16 on: February 06, 2007, 04:40:51 PM »

I can imagine the following:

A student arrives to school, get's out her PSP (Sony Play Station Portable) , connects to the schools wireless network.  The browser brings up a default web page (via a firewall) The student then goes to her school's moodle site to check into class for assignments.  She then could access the google docs and spread sheets for her school work.  She can also access her files from Indiana's e-locker, Novell i-Folder, or online file storage.  The hand-held device allows the student to gain access to the web which connects her to school.

The school only needs to provide a wireless connection, firewall, and filter.

-Use the PSP for a web browser and open up the on-line Ed-World.
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Tony Vincent
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« Reply #17 on: February 15, 2007, 08:50:48 PM »

PSP in classrooms is a reality in a few classrooms.  Check out the PSP Teachers Blog:
http://pspteachers.blogspot.com/index.html

They are doing lots of great stuff, especially with RSS!
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geoff stead
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« Reply #18 on: February 19, 2007, 06:39:05 PM »


The school only needs to provide a wireless connection, firewall, and filter.


This is exactly right!

As somebody who has spent quite a few years trying to put really useful resources on a wide variety of different devices (including PSP) I am not entirely convinced that PSP is the only device that the student will need. See Di's comment above about text input for a start. But I am absolutely convinced that schools / colleges / employers need to acknowledge that more and more of us will be accessing our information / courses / documents from a wider and wider range of devices, connecting in all sorts of wired and wireless ways.

Whether PSP, Video iPod, Nokia, PPC or whatever.

Right now it is seen by some institutions as a "perk", but I am certain that being able to access your information from anywhere, anyhow will soon become a basic right!

long live the mobile revolution  Wink

Geoff

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mr_mahoney
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« Reply #19 on: February 21, 2007, 04:29:59 AM »

online keypad:

http://www.airscanner.com/wipeout/index.html

Potential?

Anyone come up with a psp keyboard yet?
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Graham
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« Reply #20 on: March 02, 2007, 12:35:17 AM »

Yes the keyboard can be found here and is called TyDoPad.



It's a home brew set-up using the Palm wireless keyboard but it works and currently lets you type in text and save it as a .txt file on your memory stick. It's a free download and only version 0.1 so who know's what's to come?

Also video clip on <a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/_KbqaCRyVBY&amp;rel=0" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/v/_KbqaCRyVBY&rel=0</a>

If you'd like to pick up where the developer has finished the source code for TyDoPad can be downloaded here or here.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2007, 09:33:27 PM by Graham » Logged
mr_mahoney
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« Reply #21 on: April 14, 2007, 03:16:58 PM »

What is the PSP in Education initiative by Sony?
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Graham
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« Reply #22 on: April 14, 2007, 09:01:00 PM »

Try:

http://www.connectededucation.com/
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mr_mahoney
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« Reply #23 on: April 16, 2007, 02:57:14 PM »

This site has some good info on PSP in education:

http://www.connectededucation.co.uk/Homepage?Plugin=ConnectedED&TTU=0&thelayout=3&docname=PSPinEducation#

Check out the drop down menus
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mr_mahoney
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« Reply #24 on: April 17, 2007, 06:49:19 PM »

I have been collecting my research on the PSP as an educational tool on the following wiki :

http://hecc.wikispaces.com/PSP

It is amazing what people are doing with these things.
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Mr Mack
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« Reply #25 on: April 18, 2007, 07:05:55 AM »

Hi

As the Nintendo DS is out-selling Sony PSP 4:1 as well as having a touch screen and an impressive range of collaborative "intelligent gaming" software if it's not an even better platform (assuming it was a gaming device that you were going to use)?

Mack
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wolfluecker
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« Reply #26 on: April 19, 2007, 04:40:49 PM »

Quote
As the Nintendo DS is out-selling Sony PSP 4:1 as well as having a touch screen and an impressive range of collaborative "intelligent gaming" software if it's not an even better platform (assuming it was a gaming device that you were going to use)?

Completely agree, the DS has a lot going for it and could be a great learning device. My take on the recent PSP craze:

  • The PSP was designed to work as a games console AND media player (video, mp3 etc). This is what people like ConnecteED/SCEE are mostly exploiting now. In their own words "a glorified Memory Stick". The DS is much more a pure gaming device in my opinion. It can play mp3s but not video, at least not 'out of the box'.
  • The PSP web browser has a cut-down Flash Player built-in, which is interesting for a lot of educational sites/publishers. It's not very capable and only version 6, but it's there nevertheless. DS and DS Lite have got the Opera web browser but no Flash plug-in.
  • Exactly because the PSP is so far behind the DS in sales numbers, Sony are probably looking for new markets. You could even be cynical and say they just want to give the device a bit of educational 'cred'.
  • Through their other products Sony have more overall credibility to the educational sector, while Nintendo are purely seen as a games brand I'd say.
  • The PSP has been promoted in education recently. AFAIK Nintendo haven't really done that although they actually have some language-learning titles and their award-winning Brain Age.

Any comments?

Wolf.
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Mr Mack
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« Reply #27 on: April 20, 2007, 11:54:04 PM »

Hmm

Doesn't it makes more sense to focus on a system that is more popular with the target users?

I've nothing against the PSP nor do I favor the DS but in a debate over the use of such gaming products in education it seems counter-intuitive to follow a device that is failing in the market. If Sony are attempting to improve sales by getting the backing of teachers then I can't see this being very credible with teenagers. Why not just give them a PDA?

Aren't parents more comfortable with Nintendo as they have less violent games?

For little more than the price of a Sony memory stick you can get the Datel media dock for the DS that provides video.

Does Flash have a long term future? Don't software producers develop for the largest installed base of hardware?

With Microsoft Silverlight on the horizon and AJAX in open source who knows?
« Last Edit: April 21, 2007, 12:05:28 AM by Mr Mack » Logged
mr_mahoney
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« Reply #28 on: May 08, 2007, 04:41:10 PM »

Putting aside which is better psp/vrs/ds, the PSP was choosen to challenge educators in Indiana (USA) to explore the potential of a handheld gaming device as an educational tool.

Official Press Release:

The Hoosier Educational Computer Coordinators (HECC) Board is proud to
announce we are hard at work planning the 2007 State Conference November
29th and 30th at historic Union Station in downtown Indianapolis.

The HECC Board has debated many options and directions for the theme of
our 2007 conference. Our goal each year is to come up with a theme and
educational tool that will be cutting edge, stimulate dialog, foster
creative thinking, and impact our student's education. With that in
mind, this year's conference theme is "Technology Integration - Get In
The Game!" and the tool will be the PlayStation Portable (PSP).

Technology in the hands of today's students has allowed them to no
longer be just an observer of cyber-space but a major contributor. It is
easy to see that educational professionals can learn much from their
students. Students are often connected Whenever and Wherever with
Whatever. One such technology that is growing rapidly among youth as a
communication tool is the handheld gaming device known as a PSP (Play
Station Portable).

The Hoosier Educational Computer Coordinators wish to challenge Indiana
educational professionals by presenting a handheld gaming device as a
viable educational tool. The PSP not only can be used to play
educational games, but can be also used to play recorded audio and video
as well as perform as an electronic text book. The PSP can also browse
the web via wireless internet, thus putting the power of the web in the
hands of students for less than $175.00

QUESTION: How do you think the PSP could be used to educate students?
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Di Dawson
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« Reply #29 on: May 10, 2007, 02:29:02 PM »

Hi,

We just released the full set of our maths resources (animated games and activities for age 5 through 14) for the PSP. You don't get the mouse control accuracy of the PDA touch screen but for kids used to playing games it takes only a minute to adjust.

It is a fantastic platform Cool. If you have not tried it out, now is the time to do so.

Regards

David
SUMS Online
www.sums.co.uk

Picking up on David's entry previously I'd like to say that I'm currently a proud owner of David's PSP Maths resources and am busy trying them out with my son (aged 13), his friends and any colleagues I meet who might be interested in mobile techie stuff.

I must admit I had to do a scary thing by updating the operating system - which leaves you no choice to 'return to default'. This also allows a Flash player which my older version didn't have so I'm quite pleased with that.

My main point re PSPs is that I'm using mine to show people how video can be displayed on the device - that's the main reason I stood in GAME and pondered over DS Lite or PSP....the graphics capability was far superior over the DS.

I have created various types of video - using my phone, cheapy camera, Sonyhandycam, taken mpeg4s off the web, downloaded Utube video, MS Photostory creations etc - so as to discover the ease of process converting to PSP format. I wouldn't say it was easy peasy at first but now it is - just renaming files correctly is one move forward.

Why video you might ask - well I'm in the post16 sector where adults use video to support their learning for a variety of reasons. In particular video can help adults with learning difficulties remember a sequence of actions eg in a health and safety situation or I currently have a super video showing NVQ care workers how to handle elderly people

If anyone wants any of my videos for demo purposes I'm happy to deliver. Smiley
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