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jonnydavey
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Jonny Davey

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« on: March 20, 2006, 01:46:28 PM »

Do you think it could be used in a classroom effectively, I'm specifically thinking about the keyboard.
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Graham
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« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2006, 04:09:41 PM »

If I'm reading David correctly I think he's saying that an Origami PC would be as effective in the classroom as any Tablet PC with a keyboard.

Most handheld computers, Windows Mobile or Palm OS based, support inexpensive external keyboards costing £20 and up. I have a neat one that goes with my Treo phone and folds-up into a size smaller than many PDA's. There's also those funky laser "virtual keyboards" that beam a functioning keyboard onto any flat surface for use with handhelds.


Battery powered keyboards (usually a couple of AA's that last around 6 months) mean that you don't drain the power on the handheld computer either.

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James Clay
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« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2006, 02:06:44 PM »

Do you think it could be used in a classroom effectively, I'm specifically thinking about the keyboard.

As it uses the Tablet PC OS, the handwriting recognition can be quite good, I have been impressed with the handwriting recognition with respect of the Tablet PC I have been using.

If it has USB you could always plug a USB keyboard into it, or Bluetooth is another option.

I suppose a question that you need to ask is how do you envisage using it in the classroom.

We are putting together for one of the WCC Colleges a package for their Hair and Beauty Salons the use of a Tablet PC combined with a wireless projection system but using 40" LCD screens, and I am thinking about using wireless keyboards to allow direct entry by the learner from anywhere in the room.

James Clay
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James Clay
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jont
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« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2006, 08:21:01 AM »

The mention of keyboards prompted the thoughts,

 Is typing taught in schools?

 Will there be problems with RSI earlier as people are using keyboards from a lower age.

 With the projection keyboards what are the potential problems of people typing against a solid surface with no cushioning...llike a desk.. ie If you provided them to students to use  and they did have any RSI type problems who would be liable?

(I keep getting tempted to buy one of those projection keyboards, to misuse it as a MIDI controller....)
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Graham
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« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2006, 01:10:03 PM »

Good point about the laser keyboards Jon!

I've used one for a while and whilst you get the WOW! factor when you show them at conference you soon realise after using them why decent quality keyboards feature feedback and movement designed precisely to prevent or at least alleviate R.S.I.

I have to wonder how long the current notion of the Qwerty keyboard will continue given it's roots in mechanical type-setting in the early 1900's.

Maybe we should be considering the tuition of alternative data entry. I simply can't imagine people typing at the end of this century!

Captain Kirk wasn't a typist Cheesy

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toxfly
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« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2006, 04:16:22 PM »

I'm going to be a luddite and predict we'll still be using keyboards in 50 years. I've used each suceeding generation of handwriting recognition software and whilst it gets better, its dam frustrating and at the end I invariably give up.

The problem is the same as speech recognition. The computer might learn your particular way of speaking or writing, but what about  the other 20 users the computer will have that week? Also lots of kids handwriting is dreadful and as the mistakes still seem to be about 5% the labourious time spent correcting soon mounts up.

Finally there is a tactile problem in handwriting recognition. The unbending nature of the screen startes to make my skin crawl. It''s not paper, its not springy like a keyboard.

I think its back to keyboard lessons...
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James Clay
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« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2006, 10:11:03 AM »

Finally there is a tactile problem in handwriting recognition. The unbending nature of the screen startes to make my skin crawl. It''s not paper, its not springy like a keyboard.

That is something I find, I usually need a pad or a magazine and can not write direct to a single piece of paper on a desk or table.

I wonder if a future Tablet PC could have that springiness?
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James Clay
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Sim
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« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2006, 07:05:47 PM »

Hi,

 Is typing taught in schools?
 
Many primary schools have had touch typing programmes for a long time (although it was hailed as a revolution on the news a few days ago). Whether or not they actually teach typing depends on the timetable and the motivation of the staff!!

Grace
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Grace
davew
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« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2006, 10:49:49 PM »

Hi All,

Can I refocus this thread to look at the potential of the Origami device in the classroom....

Who will be trying it?

What do you think are the advantages and disadvantages?

Cheers
DaveW Undecided
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Graham
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« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2006, 04:44:31 PM »

Well done Dave for bringing us back to the subject in hand Smiley

Something spotted in the Korean Times highlighted the issues you raise concerning battery life and usability. In this unintentionally amusing report it appears that everything that could go wrong, went wrong when the VP of Samsung's PC division attempted to present the Q1 at a news conference.

Quote


Kim first tried to start the Powerpoint presentation, which was saved in his Q1. But after introducing himself, he failed to turn to the second page while his staff nervously watched him.

Unlike conventional laptops, Q1 does not have a built-in keyboard. Users type on its touch-screen keyboard or on a small external keyboard that users may find uncomfortable and unfamiliar to use.

After spending several nerve-racking minutes trying to solve the problem on his own, Kim was finally helped by one of his staff to get to the next page.

"This kind of mistake happens in every presentation, even though you practice it all night,'' he said.

But that was not the end of his bad day.

Several pages later, the large projection screen suddenly completely went black. Samsung's staff again rushed to help the vice president, and found the Q1's battery has run out.

It is not known why the battery only lasted for a few minutes of the presentation. However, Kim later admitted that Q1 has three hours of battery life and two hours when watching a DVD, which is comparably short to other laptops.

More...

[/size]

To be fair many of us have probably had our fair share of "anxiety sensitive" computer moments where nothing seems to go right but this story does sound almost Pythonesque!
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cardav
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« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2006, 11:10:41 AM »

Quote
Photos: Top Ten Worst Tech Products of 2006
Intel's voice-activated remote control, Sony's Walkman Bean, Kazaa 3.0, and (shudder) MS Origami--these are just a few of the worst crimes against technology perpetrated upon consumers this year. Check out this gallery of the Top Ten Worst Tech Products of 2006.


Found on the TechRepublic website!
http://techrepublic.com.com/2300-10877-6056647.html?tag=nl.e101

Enjoy  Undecided

David
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andyb
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« Reply #11 on: May 05, 2006, 03:56:45 PM »

http://www.intel.com/pressroom/archive/releases/20060502corp.htm

this is worth a read re intel plans
Does small for mean handheld ?? "Intel’s Discover the PC Initiative provides customized technology solutions that enable new types of PCs to meet the specific needs of the developing world. These include low-cost, fully featured, easy to use PCs for home and work; Community PCs customized for public access PC kiosks in rural areas; and low-cost PCs tailored to the needs of schools and educators. One design, codenamed “EduWise,” is a small-form-factor notebook PC designed specifically for student computing and the unique needs of teaching and interactive learning in the classroom."

Andy
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Mark van 't Hooft
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« Reply #12 on: May 09, 2006, 04:42:18 PM »

The question, does small mean handheld? is a good one. I've been tossing around the issue of defining what a handheld is with some of my colleagues here. One of the conclusions we've reached is that it doesn't just depend on the device (size, shape, footprint, etc.), but also the user. Small for an adult may mean something different than small for a child, e.g. a six-year old. One definition we will be using for some writing we will do soon is this one (note that we are using the device in question here not a handheld, but a highly mobile device, because it includes more than what we would probably consider to be a handheld:

Quote
•   high mobility (that is, they are small enough that elementary school students can hold the device in one hand and carry it from place to place);
•   a small footprint (so that they do not intrude in face-to-face interactions);
•   the computational and display capabilities to view, collect, or otherwise use representations and/or large amounts of data; and
•   the ability to support collaboration and/or data sharing.

Devices included in our definition are PDAs, mobile phones, some tablet computers, networked graphing calculators, the recently announced Origami device, the new generation of handheld gaming systems, iPods, motes, data loggers, etc.  The definition leaves out traditional laptop computers; while they have been found to be useful in education (and much has been written about their virtues), they do not fit our definition of highly mobile, and their footprint is such that they tend to intrude in face-to-face interactions.

Note that one of the foci of this definition is the idea that a highly mobile device supports and encourages interaction between users, esp. face-to-face interactions (like we would envision in a classroom or informal environment). A laptop, for example, tends to be less effective in this respect, just because of its sheer size (and we've found this even with smaller laptops). Being able to hold the device in one hand and not having to set it down seems to be the key. This does work with something like a tablet, because it tends to get used/held more like a clipboard, cradled on the forearm.

Mark
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Mark van 't Hooft
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Kent State University
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gerry.gray
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« Reply #13 on: June 20, 2006, 03:22:16 PM »

Hi Dave, hello everyone,
I've taught a lot with Tablet PCs and the students are much more switched on to the technology (what's the term you use Dave... digital natives?).  I think that these UMPCs would hit my classroom and be as inspirational as Tablets were 3/4 years ago.  Yes, I know there are problems with these little Windows computers, most annoying being the start up time, battery life and overheating; and I would like these devices to have a digital video camera so we could video experiments, but I suppose a USB webcam will do.  I think these have got to be better than a Tablet because of the weight, and surely better than a PDA, where you can't author in, say, Powerpoint.  I can't wait to get my hands on one.. I can't find the Amitek manufacturer you mention - I want to find out how much a class set would cost!
gerry
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AST in Science
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